Virtually Sober

If there is free booze and Virtualization; I'm there!

Automated bulk IP address reconfiguration with Zerto Virtual Replication

When configuring IP address changes in Zerto Virtual Replication (ZVR) one common challenge is data entry. Yes, it’s certainly easy to configure the new IP addresses in the GUI, but when you are protecting hundreds of VMs with hundreds of vNICs then using the GUI can become a problem. Not only will it take you a long time to configure each vNIC one by one, but you are introducing the risk of human error.

editvnic

To solve this challenge I created 2 PowerShell scripts to fully automate re-IP addressing in bulk. The first script “ZVR Bulk Re-IP Export v1.ps1” exports a list of every protected VM vNIC to a CSV with a column for each configuration item possible. You will need to protect every VM first for its vNIC info to be exported, edit the variables at the top of script for your environment, then run it to get the below output: Read more of this post

Protecting & Recovering Multi-TB VMs to Microsoft Azure

When replicating to Microsoft Azure using Zerto Virtual Replication 5.0 (or even Azure Site Recovery) the protected vDisks cannot be larger than 1TB due to the maximum page disk size being limited to 1TB by Microsoft. It’s rumored they are planning on increasing this to 8TB later this year, but in the meantime how do you work around this problem?
The good news is that there is a solution! On the protected VM you need to configure multiple sub-1TB disks. Don’t use 1TB exactly as the disk size, as this equates to 1024GB in a vSphere environment which is above the Azure page disk limit. Instead use a value of say 990GB to stay under the limit, but with a decent amount of space. Here you can see I’ve created 2 x 990GB VMDKs for my VM:

multi-tbvmstoazuress1

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Catching Ransomware infections with a Honeypot script & integration into Zerto Virtual Replication

Through my work at Zerto I’ve delivered multiple presentations and webinars on ransomware and how Zerto enables you to recover VMs, files and folders from seconds before the data was encrypted to minimize data loss and avoid having to pay a ransom. One question I’ve often been asked is how do I know what point in time my files were encrypted? And in one recent presentation a customer told me that their user didn’t tell IT until 3 days after the infection had occurred!

This got me thinking on how we could alert on this which led me to evaluate the different ransomware honeypot example scripts available online. These scripts validate a file placed on a user mapped share, where everyone has write permissions, against a gold or witness copy to catch the ransomware infection then perform a set of actions when found. In testing the multiple examples I struggled to find one that coped with the file itself being changed, I.E the extension changing, that ran consistently and none indicated this alert in the Zerto journal so I decided to write an example that did all of this and more. Read more of this post

Automate VM Protection with vRO & Zerto Virtual Replication – ZVM only

In this blog post I will show you how to fully automate the protection of new VMs with Zerto Virtual Replication 4.5 (ZVR) and vRealize Orchestrator (vRO).

This example is for a Zerto Virtual Manager (ZVM) that is not managed by a Zerto Cloud Manager (ZCM) and therefore won’t use the concept of ZCM managed service profiles. We will be using a combination of vSphere folders, vRO, PowerShell, a settings CSV and ZVR REST APIs to achieve automated protection.

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Automate VM Protection with vRO & Zerto Virtual Replication – ZVM & ZCM

In this blog post I will show you how to fully automate the protection of new VMs with Zerto Virtual Replication 4.5 (ZVR) and vRealize Orchestrator (vRO).

This example is for a Zerto Virtual Manager (ZVM) that is managed by a Zerto Cloud Manager (ZCM) and therefore uses service profiles pushed from the ZCM to the ZVM. A new service profile has to be created from the ZCM and used in this workflow as this is a requirement of automating VM protection through the Zerto API. We will be using a combination of vSphere folders, vRO, PowerShell, a settings CSV and ZVR REST APIs to achieve automated protection.

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Automating Bulk VM Protection – ZVM & ZCM

In this blog post I will show you how to automate the protection of VMs during initial configuration or re-installation of Zerto to a new datacenter. This example is only for a Zerto Virtual Manager (ZVM) managed by a Zerto Cloud Manager (ZCM).

I’m going to be using a combination of PowerShell, REST APIs and CSVs to complete the task. As a best practice I wouldn’t recommend creating too many VPGs simultaneously as you don’t want to overload the vCenter, storage, WAN and Zerto resources available to you. I’ll leave you to decide your own number but I personally would stick to batches of 5-25 depending on what you have at your disposal.

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Automating Bulk VM Protection with Zerto Virtual Replication – ZVM only

In this blog post I will show you how to automate the protection of VMs during initial configuration or re-installation of Zerto to a new datacenter. This example is only for a Zerto Virtual Manager (ZVM) that is not managed by a Zerto Cloud Manager (ZCM).

I’m going to be using a combination of PowerShell, REST APIs and CSVs to complete the task. As a best practice I wouldn’t recommend creating too many VPGs simultaneously as you don’t want to overload the vCenter, storage, WAN and Zerto resources available to you. I’ll leave you to decide your own number but I personally would stick to batches of 5-25 depending on what you have at your disposal.

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Introduction to Automating VM Protection with Zerto Virtual Replication

One of the most common requests I hear in my role at Zerto is to automate the protection of VMs. The 2 main use cases for this request are typically:

  1. Bulk VM protection during initial installation or re-installation. I.E you have 800 VMs to re-protect to a new datacenter and it would make more sense to automate the process (which came from a recent customer request).
  2. Automate the protection of new VMs. I.E you have new VMs being created on an hourly/daily/weekly basis be it from templates, vRealize Orchestrator or a self-service catalog and you want to automate the protection of VMs without having to manually configure DR.

The good news is that both of these use cases are easily achievable using Zerto Virtual Replication 4.5, PowerShell and the new APIs, with the examples I’m going to give you.

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Getting a List of VMs by VPG

Hi all!

In response to a recent MyZerto forum request I thought I’d write a short post on how to obtain a simple piece of information from Zerto; what VMs are protected and their VPG name. Read more of this post

Automating VRA Deployment

In the first post in this series I covered the basics of establishing an authenticated session with the Zerto API and connecting to the vCenter server. You need to configure the script examples covered in this first post in order to follow the instructions in this blog post, you can find this here:

https://virtuallysober.wordpress.com/2016/02/11/introduction-to-powershell-and-zerto-rest-api-scripting/

In the Zerto GUI its very simple to deploy a Virtual Replication Appliance (VRA), you simply click New VRA, specify the information required and click Install. Then with no-impact, no downtime or maintenance mode the VRA is deployed to the ESXi host in minutes: Read more of this post