Virtually Sober

If there is free booze and Virtualization; I'm there!

Monthly Archives: March 2014

Scripting a Recovery Plan

To protect VMs with Zerto they need to be placed into Virtual Protection Groups (VPGs) which are consistency groupings of VMs that are typically configured on a per application basis. A VM can only exist in 1 VPG at once, you can only failover the entire VPG and you can define the boot order of VMs inside each VPG.

A common request I receive is to specify a boot order between VPGs (a recovery plan) so that you can bring VPGs online in a specified order with time delays and pre/post failover scripts. A perfect use case is bringing Application 1 (I.E a Finance DB) online before Application 2 (I.E a CRM). You could work around this by placing all the VMs that form both applications in the same VPG, but this then removes the fidelity of failing over an individual application in the cases of logical failures. Another use case is running a site wide script that should only be initiated when failing over everything.

Based on this requirement I decided to create the Recovery Plan script. Read more of this post

Adding Zerto cmdlets to a script

In order to run Zerto cmdlets inside a script you have to add the snapin. This is easily done with the following command:

add-pssnapin Zerto.PS.Commands

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Selecting Zerto Checkpoints in PowerShell

When using Zerto PowerShell cmdlets it can be required to select a checkpoint (a point in time) in the journal of changes from which to perform an operation. The Zerto PowerShell cmdlets which require a checkpoint to be defined are:

Start-failovertest
Clone-vpg

A checkpoint is also required for the POST APIs “Performing a Failover of a Specified VPG” and “Test a VPG for Failing Over”. To select a checkpoint the following cmdlet is used:

get-checkpoints -virtualprotectiongroup WebApp1 -zvmip 192.168.0.116 -zvmport 9080 -username root -password Zerto123 -confirm:$false

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Scripting with Zerto Basics

To run PowerShell scripts with Zerto I recommend the following requirements be fulfilled, on the host running the scripts, as a best practice to cover running anything and everything:

  1. PowerShell 3.0 installed (available here)
  2. Zerto PowerShell Cmdlets 3.1 onwards (available from the Zerto Self-Service Portal here)
  3. Zerto PowerShell Security configured (see below)
  4. vSphere PowerCLI 5.5 (available here)
  5. Remote signed scripts allowed to run by running PowerShell as admin then the below cmd:
    “set-executionpolicy remotesigned”
  6. Ignore invalid certificate option set ignore to speed up connect-viserver operations by running PowerShell as admin then the below cmd:
    “set-PowerCLIConfiguration -invalidCertificateAction “ignore” -confirm:$false”

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Introduction to my blog

Hi and welcome to my blog.  I will be blogging about common queries I often come across in my role as Solutions Engineer for Zerto, as well as cool Zerto features, but I will mainly cover the many different PowerShell scripts I write in my spare time to extend the functionality of Zerto. Some of the scripts I will be releasing as standalone tools. For these I will create a new page dedicated to each tool to go into more detail.

I will say this many times but I can’t stress enough that all scripts on this blog are not supported by Zerto in any shape or form. I am however happy to provide ad-hoc support if you have any questions or issues and I recommend using the comments section on the relevant post to ask.

I might also be tempted to throw in some reviews of the odd Virtualization event and subsequent party. As a Yorkshireman I definitely enjoy a few free drinks!

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Don’t worry I didn’t get through all of these :-), but I certainly did try! If you have any spcecific PowerShell scripts you would like me to cover in a blog post feel free to contact me using the form below:

I’m looking forward to sharing some really good content! Thanks,

Joshua